No Straight Lines: Radical Structures that are Redefining Architecture

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www.bahaihouseofworship.in; open Tue-Sun 9.30 a.m.-5.30 p.m.; entry free).

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Appeared in the December 2014 issue as “Universal Appeal”.

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www.facebook.com/HarbinGrandTheatre). —Rumela Basu

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www.ec.gc.ca; open 16 Jan-4 Sept, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; adults CAD15/₹760, youth under 17 free). —Rumela Basu

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www.lesarts.com; guided tours for adults €8/₹600, visitors up to 14 years €4/₹300, children under five free.)—Rumela Basu

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In modern architecture, rules are constantly broken. Straight lines are forsaken for fluid curves that rise and fall with the landscapes they inhabit. Some of these structures blend seamlessly into their habitats, others stand out defiantly, like alien spaceships, or in the case of the Ordos Museum in Inner Mongolia (pictured above), like a giant pig. But they’re all arresting in their own outlandish way. Click through for snapshots of stunning structures from around the world.

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