Wild Things: Where to See the Planet’s Most Magnificent Migrations

In Africa, Australia, and beyond, nature is on the move. | NGT Staff

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Demoiselle cranes bond for life and reinforce their fidelity with elaborate dance rituals. Photo: Dhritiman Mukherjee

The call of the wild: Every day millions of animals, from whale sharks to butterflies, answer an imperative etched in their genes to get moving in order to survive. Their journeys may cover millions of kilometres in a lifetime and are fraught with drama, it’s no wonder many tour itineraries focus on these seasonal migrations. “It’s a thrill seeing—and, in a way, participating in—a natural event that’s been taking place for thousands of years,” says Julia Nesbitt of Wildland Adventures. “It’s a chance to reconnect with the animal kingdom.”

In India too, thousands of migratory birds flock every winter. They usually come from colder northern latitudes, flying long distances over Himalayan peaks from as far away as Siberia. Besides the migratory birds, there are nomadic birds that erratically flock to different wetlands, salt flats, and other friendly environments.

Appeared in the February 2014 issue as “Wild Things” and “Flock Together”.

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www.rekero.com) occupies a prime location for migration viewing in the Maasai-Serengeti ecosystem.

Photo: Anup Shah

Appeared in the February 2014 issue as "Wild Things".

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